Ruptured World Segregates New Album, ‘Shore Rituals’ From The Planetary Series For A Darkened Realm Of Ancient Landscapes

Since 2018, Ruptured World has presented us with an astounding trio of albums in his Planetary series that follows the visionary experiences of several generations of archeological experiences, based on the discoveries of the Macrae family. Those albums expanded upon a universe with galactic drones and immense piano sequences that bridge the gap between haunting ambience and a clever storyline that thrills with divine amazement. Now back with an exploratory tale of maritime enthrallment, Ruptured World produces an audible story of daring adventure through sonic soundscapes, field recordings and a cryptic narrative. The end result is ‘Shore Rituals’, a near fifty minute excursion through dangerous worlds and environmental contemplation.

The majestic anthology begins with “The Merman”, an introspective nuance of various samples and soundscapes that slowly disintegrates into a somber drone with random musical oddities thrown in. The soothing nature of this intro sets a relaxing tempo and when the beautiful piano textures commence, it places this track on a whole new level. The sound of crashing waves in the background sends the listener to another world of natural scenic beauty. “Black Tides Harken To The Summons Of Eons” begins with peaceful wave motions before leading into a powerful percussive tone set to a dark cadence. Drones and hisses add a nostalgic feel as the amount of space provided allows for other sound patterns to evolve. “The Silencing Tide” carries on that same sediment as random frequency bursts create a vivid state of eeriness. Haunting soundscapes and vocalizations fill the void as this track seemingly comes to life. “The Whales Mouth” commences with a calming natural vibe while layers of placid drones and percussive elements produce a tranquil atmosphere. Random sounds of computer generated noises add a celestial feel, as this is one of the most dynamic tracks on the album. In typical Ruptured World fashion, we’re treated to a dose of spectacular narrations that verbally expand upon this audial transmission. “Radio Signature Interludium” launches with an array of modulations that puts the listener in the middle of a space mission, while a consoling piano melody systematically creates an offsetting foundation of bleakness. This obscure track ends with the commotion of relentless waves crashing along a desolate shore. “Catharsis II” is a spooky piano piece that features the retro sounds of tape hisses and a dragging element that slightly alters the speed of the track. The exquisite use of synth tones gives this a fantastic retro feel, as if taken from a 80’s science fiction movie soundtrack. Probably one of my favorite songs on the album. “The Human Vessel” continues on with the maritime field recordings while adding an ominous musical recording that is barely detectable. Soon, an alluring piano melody is added, increasing the magnificent appeal of this track. Another narrative sequence provides a supplemental piece to this adventure, increasing the depth of this darkened experience. “Bow Fiddle Rock” is a no-frills dark ambient excursion that is as hypnotizing as it is sedative. Minimalistic drones lean more to particular warmness, but it’s the maniacal samples that proves it’s disturbing appeal. “The Unexplained Fury” extends the bleakness of the previous track with enthralling drones and crisp soundscapes that submerge the listener into an enchanted maritime experience. There is also a soothing melody throughout that is reminiscent of a retrospective dreamscape. The last track on the album is “The Three Kings”, a final glance into this fascinating tale of ancient oceanic mystery. Harrowing drones and suspenseful synth chops bridge the worlds of suspended animation and natural essence. These looping sounds create an epic realm of controlled chaos and ethereal beauty. Obscure samples and random radio frequencies fuse seamlessly with these qualities, producing a transient ambience of the highest order.

It’s apparent that the audial cosmos created by Ruptured World come naturally. Every album emulates a particular environment, whether it’s in a series of recordings or a diversion into a different realm. ‘Shore Rituals’, allows Ruptured World to have a clean break from the Planetary albums while diving into a new environment of quintessential excellence. I appreciate this new atmosphere and particularly like the massive use of field recordings and samples as it conceives a unique take on the Dark Ambient genre. If you’ve not had the opportunity to spin this fascinating recording, I can’t recommend it enough. Please download this fantastic album from the link below.

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Links:

https://cryochamber.bandcamp.com/album/shore-rituals

Dark Ambient, Synthwave And Noise Collide on Trajedesaliva’s Intelligent Offering, ‘Ultratumbra’

Sometimes, the best albums out there are the ones that haven’t been heard yet. There are many gems hidden away on bandcamp and often it’s like a diamond in the rough, searching for the one that offers pure cosmic bliss. Fortunately, Bandcamp is one of the best platforms for music these days – especially for obscure genres – so finding an album as impressive as ‘Ultratumbra’ by Trajedesaliva is certainly appeasing to these ears. Combining all of the elements that I love about esoteric music, ‘Ultratumbra’ delivers forty two minutes of musical euphoria that fuses Dark Ambient, noise, spoken word and retrospective synthwave. The modulations that prowl behind every corner are unexpected but are eagerly welcomed, as this album is supremely put together and most of all, enjoyable on multiple levels.

Sonic album opener, “Todo Era Blanco”, sounds like an immediate drift back into time when retro analog synths ruled the airways and the break of dawn demanded its own sound signature. This track builds in grand layers with a lot of reverberation to thicken the sound. The synths are clean without being crisp, like a morning fog clearing before a beautiful day. Spots of percussion can be heard throughout without going overboard and this is such a grand way to start this amazing album. “A Casa Por Las Vías” continues on the strengths of the first tracks with massive, elongated synths that are slightly muffled but concise in the mix. We also get our first listen of a spoken word bit (spoken in Spanish) and it sounds so bleak with the terrifying layer of noises and percussive elements happening in the background. Upon the completion of the spoken word element, there is a climatic shift in music as it builds up in devious fashion before collapsing into a beautiful and melodic synthwave track. “Familia Ferro” commences with a loud, constant tone, followed by a short spoken word piece. It immediately unfolds into harsh noise modulations that shake the foundation with its strident industrial intonations. Next up is the multi-faceted, “Arenas Calientes”. Beginning with a single keyboard chop and then quickly expanding into multiple layers before suddenly unfolding into a mechanized tone, this track goes through several pitch shifts and succeeds at altering ones mood from dark to anxious to downright maniacal. Toward the end, sharp whispers can be heard throughout, adding some mysticism to this already terrifying song. “Mamá Es Un Animal Morado” starts with a jolting tone, like a large turboprop airplane already in mid flight. However, other sound effects are introduced, creating a spacious melody and then spoken words take over. The track deviates from the harshness and turns into a somber affair and the spoken words continue to complete the calming nature of everything that is fused together up to this point. “Mammillaria Sempervivi” is another melodic affair with dreamy keyboard harmonies and a compelling bass line that’s adds a great bit of depth. The spoken words continue to tell their tale and then 80’s style keys and beats commence, adding yet another aspect to this incredibly diverse album. “Queremos Verte” maintains the keyboard harmonies of the last track but adds an extra layer of emotion with superior song writing and haunting production. Even the spoken words sound different in this track, as the narrator seems to be at ease or in a more comforting situation than previously. The final track on the album is “Ultratumbra” and it immediately begins with a line of spoken word before fusing into a harmonic keyboard composition that sounds straight out of the 80’s. This track is magnificently arranged and contains all of the elements that I love about Trajedesaliva. Although it starts out smooth and alluring, there is a middle section that begins to fill out with harsh noises and drum rhythms that’s simply infectious to listen to. This song is so wonderfully arranged, I just wish it would never end.

Although Trajedesaliva is a new artist for me, they’ve been around for over twenty years. It’s a travesty that I’m just now getting to know their craft but I couldn’t be more pleased with what I’ve been exposed to so far. From the retro compositions, nostalgic arrangements, well placed spoken word bits and great use of industrialized noise, ‘Ultratumbra’ contains everything I could ever ask for in an album. I highly recommend checking this one out so please click on the link below and support this amazing artist.

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Links:

https://trajedesaliva.bandcamp.com/album/ultratumba

Eyre Transmissions XII – Interview with Dark Ambient / Necrochill Producer, Sumatran Black

These days, Bandcamp is my go-to platform for a wide assortment of music. I love how it’s given artists unlimited creativity and the ability to showcase their musical aptitude regardless of style, genre or other unconventional standards. One artist that demonstrates this capability is Sumatran Black. Not only is it the name of the labels flagship artist, but it also represents the Bandcamp page itself – Sumatran Black Records. This Dark Ambient/Necrochill page is also home to Black Box Memories and Ataşehir – two other fantastic creations of the Sumatran Black composer himself. The albums produced by Sumatran Black Records are some of my favorite in recent years and although each project is different, they bring a needed variety of memorable compositions to the dark electronic community that are eagerly welcomed. I recently had the opportunity to interview the composer behind the label to find out more about each project and what the future holds for Sumatran Black Records.

1. Thank you so much for this interview opportunity. I’m constantly amazed by the impressive and unique projects that you have going on with your Bandcamp page. Have you always had a vision to create multiple projects, covering an array of themes and sonic adventures?

I’ve always really enjoyed other artists who have released music under pseudonyms or side projects etc for example, I really love the Smackos project by Dutch artist Legowelt, and in terms of dark music I think the Lurker of Chalice project by Leviathan is a really good example of how using a different project name can open up a whole range of opportunities for musical expression.

To be honest when I started out, I didn’t really have any distinct vision or plan for either the music releases or the label. I just wanted to record some music after very long hiatus from having anything to do with music creation and just take it from there. I tend to believe that once you get the ball rolling on something artistically, it will often guide you in its own direction and you can kind of shape the overall ideas into something more focused and concrete. Which I think is an accurate description of what happened with the Sumatran Black Records label. As I began to take it more seriously and produce more music it was obvious there would have to be different names for different projects just to maintain a sense thematic clarity.

2. If I had to guess, I’d say that Sumatran Black was your flagship project. Was this your first endeavor in the Dark Ambient arena or was there something else before that?

Sumatran Black was the first.

3. Were you involved with any other musical endeavors prior to Sumatran Black? If so, what were they and what led you to Dark Ambient?

I’ve been involved in lots of projects before but most of my music endeavours previous to Sumatran Black involved writing music for theatre (Opera and Musical Theatre). Unfortunately despite my best efforts, nothing made it to the stage. I still have hopes to resurrect some of these ideas in the future.

With regards to my journey towards darker music and dark ambient, I guess my character helped steer me in that direction. And I should add that I wouldn’t really class myself as a purely Dark Ambient composer. I think what I’m trying to do is often less textural and less static in terms of movement than a great deal of Dark Ambient. I would also add that I’ve tried to avoid presenting my music with an overly polished sound (in terms of production) in general. Which is something that I would associate with a lot of Dark Ambient. Hence the term Necrochill. As the genre has become more popular through the good work of labels like Cryochamber and the inclusion of Dark Ambient music in mainstream video games, it seems that the Dark Ambient sound has become more homogeneous and less distinctive between artists. I want to avoid this.

Of course my music does have many elements that are common with Dark Ambient and I have no problem with it being categorised in those terms.

4. ‘A Taxonomy of Grief’ (by Sumatran Black) is one of my favorite Dark Ambient experiences of the year so far. Can you tell us a little bit about the Necrotrilogy and how this album came about?

The Necrotrilogy is a trilogy of releases under the name Sumatran Black designed to be thematically and musically linked, and to introduce the audience to my concept of necro chill. Which is essentially just a funny name to categorise my main musical interest which is dark music that is cathartic, emotional and has strong elements of lo fi and some elements of the 2nd wave of black metal necro sound but reimagined in a more ambient context.

‘A Taxonomy of Grief’ is the third and final part of the Necrotrilogy. Musically it’s supposed to be a summation of the sound of the previous two albums. Thematically it’s the most personal of the trilogy and is in the simplest of terms an album about loss and recovery.

https://sumatranblack.bandcamp.com/album/a-taxonomy-of-grief

5. What are the other albums that make up the remainder of the Necrotrilogy?

Part 1: In the Dread

Part 2: Fathomz

Part 3: A Taxonomy of Grief

Not part of the trilogy: A Page of Madness Soundtrack, Elegy for a Lost Cosmonaut.

6. Do you already have plans for any upcoming Sumatran Black albums?

Not an album but I have an EP ready to go into the next stage of recording. The demos are complete, and the EP is a spiritual successor to Elegy for a Lost Cosmonaut. Its working title is Broken Timelines.

7. Let’s shift gears to Black Box Memories. Another stellar project that combines Dark Ambient and lo-fi electronica. I’m so intrigued by this project but how did it come about?

Usually when I’m in the final stages of a project in terms of mixing and mastering I tend to get bored of listening to the tracks over and over again and so I often do some recordings in the middle of this process just to give myself some variation almost like a palate cleanser if you will. And so when I was finishing off In the Dread (which took a long time), I had a lot of other tracks I had been working on which would not fit that project but I thought was strong enough musically to stand alone in a music project in their own right. Those tracks would form ‘Transmissions’ the first Black Box Memories album.

8. Although the Black Box Memories recordings are very modern, they have an excellent retro vibe to them as well. Is this a sound that you were planning for or did it just come about through experimentation?

I don’t really know where the sound came from first and foremost it was initially probably a reaction to the sound of In the Dread. That album is very claustrophobic and employs some quite extreme audio processing and I guess Black Box Memories is sonically just more open and less demanding of the listener. And as I said before musical projects often dictate their own outcomes. So in the case of Black Box Memories the first demos had a very nostalgic and lo fi vintage sound to them and so as more tracks will created they became influenced by the initial demos. I think also at the time I had access to more sounds, I’d upgraded my system and invested in some 80s retro synth clones and my thinking was how can I create a musical idea that uses the nostalgic sounds of my musical youth but recontextualises them in a kind of more dark arena. if you can imagine how vaporwave manipulates old samples in a way to produce something that has a completely different emotional flavour. I thought maybe that would be possible with say for example a Yamaha DX7 VST. Could I take a very recognisable electric piano sound and then sonically manipulate it in a way that sounds even more vintage/lo fi – almost like a musical exaggeration – and then use this sound design in more dark and almost psychedelic musical compositions.

https://sumatranblack.bandcamp.com/album/this-loving-presence

9. On ‘This Loving Presence’, you use a lot of narrative samples – which blend perfectly with the arrangements. Is there an underlying story with these, or are they used to create a particular ambience for the listening experience?

I guess ‘This Loving Presence’ was greatly influenced by my mood and habits at the time of composition which involved lots of late nights and lack of sleep and watching YouTube videos to try and remedy the situation. Most of the narrative samples are heavily edited ASMR style video quotes. I took those snippets of dialogue and then edited them in a way that would create sentences that had a very sharp and poignant emotional resonance immediately.

10. Now, I definitely have to bring up Ataşehir, because out of all of your projects, this one is probably my favorite. This project is a bit more minimalistic and desolate that your others; what were some of the influences for creating this one?

Although it probably sounds nothing like it, the main influence at the beginning of the Ataşehir project was the work of Stars of the Lid and also GAS. Probably my two favourite drone and ambient artists.

https://sumatranblack.bandcamp.com/album/when-the-time-comes

11. I reviewed 2020’s ‘AVM’ album and I loved the theme that was represented within. Are all Ataşehir albums created with a concept in mind?

I think that I can safely say that pretty much every album and EP I’ve recorded (not only Ataşehir) has been what would broadly be described as a concept album. Sometimes I give an explicit explanation in the liner notes, sometimes the concept is hidden in the album and song titles. 

I have given a previous interview where I go into detail about the Ataşehir project https://ambientmusic.com/interviews/sumatran_black

12. On the latest album, ‘When The Time Comes’, the drone work is absolutely fantastic and has a wide range of melody in it. How did you go about creating these sonic soundscapes?

I think with Ataşehir I always have this overriding influence of abstract expressionism and then I’m always trying to find ways of manifesting that musically. I was lucky with ‘When the Time Comes’ because I found a very particular VST that I used throughout the whole process. I won’t name it because I don’t want to give all my secrets away but the person who designed the instrument is aware of the fact that it was used for the entire album.

Maybe I can just describe the overall composition technique that was used. Most of the tracks consist of maybe three or four drone layers that are intersecting with each other to create a musical foundation – and this is the drone element. Then on top of that the melodic element you refer to are improvisations with a synth or a guitar. These improvisations are cut and edited and looped in an asymmetric way to create kind of melodic tension across the pieces.

13. I love the song titles that you come up with for this project. Do they have a particular meaning, and how do you come with those?

I usually take a long time with song titles I really enjoy that aspect of creating music and it’s something I have a lot of fun with. In the case of the album ‘When the Time Comes’, the titles definitely all have a meaning and maybe I can try and clarify that. The album is supposed to describe a near future or alternative future Istanbul after some strange cataclysmic event. Therefore, the song titles refer to numerous locations in the city but some of those locations are real and some of them are imagined future locations. So, for example, the Istanbul Canal does not exist but it might do in the near future. Also, Levent 4.2 does not exist, but Levent 4 exists. If anyone is interested, on the bandcamp album notes I have included a location guide which kind of explains everything.

14. I recently became familiar with one of your older projects, Haram Tapes. These albums are a lot of fun and seem to defy genre limitations. What makes this project so different?

The main reason that project is so different is because it involves two people. Myself and my collaborator See Safari. It would take a long time to go into detail about all the concepts and ideas behind Haram Tapes, but here is a recent interview we did.

15. Are there plans for more Haram Tapes releases?

Yes, we are discussing the concept for the next album at the moment.

https://haramtapes.bandcamp.com/album/scorpions-fountains

16. Speaking of “releases”, do you have any physical releases (I.e. CD, Cassette, LP..) of any of your projects?

Yes, there are cassettes available for Haram Tapes. Logistically, it hasn’t been possible for me to produce physical releases for Sumatran Black Records. However, it’s my plan that all Sumatran Black Records will have physical versions available from now on. This will begin with a new dungeon synth project I’m currently working on. I also plan to slowly but surely add physical releases to the entire back catalogue.

17. Do you have a home studio in which you record and produce your work?

Yes I do. It’s quite minimal and now I also have made it portable. Before all my music used to be created in my home studio desk setup with big monitors etc but recently I’ve tried to do all my initial work just on a laptop so I can be portable add more flexible with my workspace. ‘When the Time Comes” and “This Loving Presence” were recorded and mixed almost entirely on a small laptop with headphones and they were only moved to my larger studio area (the big computer as it were) during the mastering process.

18. What is your gear setup like? Do you have a preference of analog equipment over digital (VST’s etc..)?

I tend to avoid talking about gear and setups too much because I’d like to encourage all musicians to just use whatever they have available. You don’t need expensive analogue gear you don’t need the latest DAW, you just need ideas and some dedication. the first Sumatran Black album was recorded on GarageBand with no third party VSTs for example.

But to answer your question I really do love both analogue and digital but my priority is practicality and pragmatism. So, I can tell you at this moment I own two or three very good analogue synthesisers but they’re not in the same country as my studio (and not one note from them has appeared on any of my records). I’m doing everything in the box just using vsts because that’s what I have available. I’m planning to build something more substantial in the near future with the aim of implementing some more outboard gear.

19. Again I appreciate this opportunity for the interview and I’m always looking forward to new music by you. Do you have any departing thoughts for your fans that may be reading this?

Thanks for listening and reading. If you got this far, please consider following Sumatran Black Records on Bandcamp as this is my main hub for all news and info about new releases. New Dungeon Synth project coming soon.

Links:

https://sumatranblack.bandcamp.com

https://www.sumatranblackrecords.com

https://www.facebook.com/sumatranblack/

https://youtube.com/user/reevespeterson

https://haramtapes.bandcamp.com

Infinexhuma Amasses A Large-Scale Aural Attack With Intense Soundscapes On ‘Frontier’

When it comes to ominous soundscapes and adventurous Dark Ambient compositions that are filled with terror-induced tones and agonizing drones, Infinexhuma has to be one of the front runners that consistently supplies this huge undertaking. One thing you can always count on with an Infinexhuma album is a grim experience that clinches like a slowly tightening vice grip. On the latest deafening effort, ‘Frontier’, the tones are colder, soundscapes more chilling, and an overall dominating audial ordeal that is more dismal than ever. Also, enlisting the help of other Dark Ambient elite artists such as Blood Box, Neraterræ, and Common Eider, King Eider, together they catapult this deviant journey into multiple realms of chaos. At almost one hour and forty minutes long, this bleak expedition has enough creepy twists and turns to create and angst-filled environment.

The intoxicating album opener, “Converter”, is an all-out onslaught of malevolent sounds, designed to overwhelm the senses and bring forth nightmarish reactions. The haunting drones are propelled to a grueling depth with the help of industrialized soundscapes and a flock of crows, circling in agitation. This ten minutes endeavor does not let up and thoroughly prepares the listener for the next hour and a half. “Orbital (feat. Blood Box)” creeps along at a gradual pace, refining the audial invasion of the first track, and subduing the listener into a catatonic state. Terror-filled screeches and modulations grow louder as the weight of this track becomes even heavier. The next track, “Sword” summons ancient, dark vibes as the mildly distorted drone appends itself to the listeners subconscious. More like a malicious space ambient outing, there are intense ritualistic moments throughout that is reminiscent of a doomed celestial society. Fabricated screams elicit moments of terror as this haunting track beckons the darkest of times. “Sweeper” keeps the nightmare sequence alive with alluring drones and field recordings. As if surviving another dimension, grim manifestations are on full display in eerie fashion. “Heaven March (feat. Neraterræ)” displays signs of solitude and emptiness, as these superior drones have an echo effect, creating a wall of sound that embodies desolation. Sonic soundscapes present a trance-like significance that is addictive to listen too. This is probably one of my favorite tracks on the album. “Position In Flames” is a slow builder but well worth the wait. Light drones and incredulous synths seem far off and blurry at first, but slowly form into a dynamic track full of distorted frequencies and angst. As they start to fade into a warm drone sound, breathing becomes normal and an escape back to reality is in close focus. “Catharsis Of Goodbye is nearly thirteen minutes long and runs the gamut of emotional brain patterns. Beginning with a short, foreign narrative, it fuses into an assembly of sound that takes its time to decimate those that listen. From hollow drones and mechanized soundscapes to retro synthwave distortions, this track contains the elements and checks the blocks for a true dark ambient excursion. Next up is “Deep Runnel (feat. Common Eider, King Eider)” and it’s fascinating resistance of grueling, harsh moments make this one of the most effective tracks on the album. Maintaining a low compulsion for gradual effects, this one builds in anticipation without breaking its lethargic flow. “In The End” is a supernatural spectacle of sound and voice, as they fuse together in a dreamlike state. An interesting addition of EDM synths and monstrous backing tones are a welcomed surprise and I’m sure many listeners will appreciate this branching out to additional genres and will succumb to multiple listenings in one sitting. “Forged” begins as a minimalistic piece but grows into a fierce synthwave crossover song that features beautiful synth leads and darkened drones. There are other obscure sequences that add to this amazing sound, creating a monumental track that easily stands out amongst the others. “Every Door” is discordant offering that is full of twists and turns, including heavily distorted & sequenced vocalizations. Although it starts off semi-peaceful, it morphs into a noise-filled composition that becomes one of the harshest tracks on the album. The final track on the album is “Stormless”. Another stellar feat in space ambience, this enticing arrangement will have the listener drifting off to the far reaches of the bleak, uncharted universe. Although all is safe, you never know what’s lurking around every corner, as this song will have the listener calmly anticipating what the future holds. Such a captivating way to end this preeminent Dark Ambient experience.

I can always count on Infinexhuma to provide the ultimate Dark Ambient experience. Whether it’s cinematic soundscapes, ritualistic tones, harsh noise or space ambience, each album provides a unique platform for transparency with all of these musical forms. ‘Frontier’ is no different, as it challenges the listener to open the mind to fully embrace all of these magnificent compositions. If you’ve not heard this colossal recording yet, please visit the link below and experience one of the best Dark Ambient recordings out right now.

Please Like/Follow my blog so that you’ll get first hand updates every time I post a review. Thanks for visiting the Dungeon!!

Links:

https://infinexhuma.bandcamp.com/album/frontier

Eighth Tower Records unveils companion book for ‘The Black Stone – Music For Lovecraftian Summonings’

The Black Stone – Stories For Lovecraftian Summonings

In January of this year, Eighth Tower records released another groundbreaking album of Dark Ambient resonance that featured the best-of-the-best artist of the genre. Some of them are amongst my favorite and include Mombi Yuleman, Alphaxone, Ashtoreth, NEW RISEN THRONE and Moloch Conspiracy to name a few. All of these artist successfully constructed Lovecraftian-themed tracks of fascinating darkness and a sonic exploratory of unmatched mythical subject matter. Fast forward a few months and we find another innovative event for Eighth Tower Records in the form of their first-ever book release. A companion to ‘The Black Stone’ album, it is entitled, ‘The Black Stone – Stories For Lovecraftian Summonings’ and features twenty seven tales of horror inspired by H.P. Lovecraft and his Cthulhu Mythos.

Here is some additional information about the book and writers, as found on the Eighth Tower Records Bandcamp page:

Featuring: Ramsey Campbell, Brian M Sammons, Glynn Owen Barrass, Lucy A. Snyder, E.A. Black, Chris Kelso, Andrew Coulthard, Stephen Mark Rainey, Kevin Lewis, Richard A. Scott, Russell Smeaton, John Buja, Made in DNA, David Agranoff, Pete Rawlik, Brian C. Short, Michael Housel, John Chadwick, David Voyles, Konstantine Paradias, Edward Morris, Parry Milton, Phil Breach, Garrett Cook, Andrew Freudenberg, Love Kolle, Sarah Walker.

Curated by Raffaele Pezzella
Cover illustration by John Chadwick
Editing by Parry Milton

https://eighthtowerrecords.bandcamp.com/merch/the-black-stone-stories-for-lovecraftian-summonings-book-cd
https://eighthtowerrecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-black-stone-music-for-lovecraftian-summonings

Grab a copy of this book before it’s sold out and if you’ve not heard the amazing album that was released back in January, do yourself a favor a download that one right away for a stunning audial experience.

Please Like/Follow my blog so that you’ll get first hand updates every time I post a review. Thanks for visiting the Dungeon!!

Links:

https://eighthtowerrecords.bandcamp.com/music

https://unexplainedsoundsgroup.bandcamp.com

Abstract Conveyances Demand Universal Reciprocity On Mauve Zone’s ‘Transmissions From Carcosa’

I want to take a minute to appreciate the hard work that these Dark Ambient artists do to establish a story (or theme, if you will) for the audial juggernaut that comes to fruition at the end result of their albums. Not only do they go “all out” to always provide high-quality music, but producing a noble storyline is equally as important in order to assist in delivering a valuable product to us fans. That especially holds true on Mauve Zone’s valiant ‘Transmissions From Carcosa’ album. Showing a major Lovecraftian influence, this album digs deep into mythological worlds and obscure subject matter to deliver a creative realm of dark ambience with trance-like impulses and mystical drones on seven massive tracks.

“The Calling From Hyades” begins with a long, drawn out crescendo of tonal modulations that turns into a sonic drone, and the foundation for the first part of this near ten minute long track. As the drone passes and slowly fades, the ringing of bells signifies an endless apprehension of foreboding soundscapes that will follow. Although a bit minimalistic – as far as composition goes – the effects run the gamut from deep sounds to higher pitched synth pad intonations. “The Shores Of Lake Hali” commences with ominous soundscapes, as if providing the audial imagery for a horror film. Although the feeling is rather calm, it’s more intense than soothing and the range of harrowing variety will leave you in anticipation for more dismal sounds that may follow. “Fungi From Yuggoth” starts with an oppressive, industrial beat with an echo effect and along with the drone that is contributed, sounds bleak and poignant. Although this sound remains constant throughout, minor adjustments are added and frequency distortions are thrown in to give it that futuristic and mechanized feel. “Cassilda’s Song” begins with an extremely cold vibe, complements of the dissonant sound effects and layered drones. Slight alterations are made to this otherwise track-long, steady composition and sound bits of vocal narrations are added as well. An overall very creepy augury, it’s exactly how I envision Dark Ambient to sound when representing Lovecratian subject matter. Next up is the industrious piece, “The Yellow Sign”. Massive, swaying drones assuage the subconscious while synth chops play a manufactured sound of cold, discordant harmonies. Distorted attunement adds a sense of unity to this complex score and its trance-like arrangement is mesmerizing. “Tatters Of The King” compiles the best features of darkwave and synthwave and fuses them with Dark Ambient soundscapes to produce one of the best tracks on the album. A mosaic of instrumentation is fine tuned and perfectly deconstructed on this song and as the listener gets lost in the conglomerate of modulations, the represented story starts to unfold. The final track on the album, “The Red Comet” is a soundtrack worthy composition and the songwriting translates amazingly well to the synth and pad arrangements. Exotic sound effects present a retrospective feeling as this massive album comes to a close. This track is a warm light that shines bright behind the dark, grim songs that proceeded it. An excellent way to end this album that will immediately make you want to give this a second spin.

Mauve Zone’s ‘Transmissions From Carcosa’ is a spectacular album that paints a dark, fascinating picture of a mythological world of Lovecraftian influence. There is a variety of music on this album that breaks the monotony of minimalistic droning and I love the industrial and synthwave influences on several of these tracks. If this is a sign of things to come, then Mauve Zone will soon be a favorites amongst Dark Ambient fans. I highly recommend this album so please click on the link below and support Mauve Zone.

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Links:

https://mauvezone.bandcamp.com/album/transmissions-from-carcosa

Randal Collier-Ford Ventures Down A Dark, Ritualistic Path on ‘Advent’

If you’re in the market for Dark Ambient that is loaded with substance and distinction, then look no further than Randal Collier-Ford. His unmistakable sound hangs in the balance between desolate drones and ritualistic terror. Somewhere amidst that rudimentary structure, frays of industrial modulations, sonic soundscapes and transcendental field recordings integrate seamlessly to present his signature take on Dark Ambient madness. However, on his latest effort, ‘Advent’, we find a broader approach to the songwriting venture, presenting a more melodic and cinematic sound than ever before. Ranging from effervescent orchestrations to tonal black ambience, ‘Advent’ is the Randal Collier-Ford album I’ve been waiting to hear for a very long time.

The opening track is the near twenty minute long juggernaut, “Beckoning Absurd Shapes”. It begins as expected – bleak, desolate soundscapes with a calm-before-the-storm approach. The drones ascend like low, howling winds and the sound of horns that resembles an early warning alarm enacts in the distance. Disturbing vibes continue to play out, creating an environment of angst and dread. Prolonged stringed arrangements add a slight gothic presence with a noir sediment. Ritualistic undertones in the form of dark, inaudible chants add a necessary layer of power and sonic presence to this track as it continues to ebb and flow with its audible storyline. The last half of this track is inundated with ghastly drones, beautiful stringed compositions and a variety of field recordings that will keep the listener engaged in this visionary conquest. The next track is “Eyes Of The Temple (feat. Northumbria)”. Northumbria – known for their textured guitar and bass recordings – adds a gripping layer of coldness that embodies the true essence of minimalistic ambience. The musical combination of these artists establishes a dreadful world of chaos and darkness that builds into a massive wall of sound. The star attraction in this track is the grandiose guitar reverb. It creates a sound so hollow and disturbing that it’s bound to create nightmarish effects. The final track on the album is the twelve minute long “The Second Wound”. Commencing with powerful drones of a destructive nature, this song slowly ascends into a world of desolate visions. A sultry piano arrangement leads into a tribal drum line of war-like proportions. Enormous soundscapes and industrialized summonings bring forth a climactic ending as the drones fade between the bombastic percussive parts. The track finally comes to a close, as the drums dissolve, leaving synth pads to create a fulfilling ending.

Randal Collier-Ford never disappoints, and has always delivered amazing results on his previous albums. However, with ‘Advent’, he’s stepped up his game and has conveyed his best performance yet. The epic track lengths make the difference for me, as they allow for the atmospherics to captivate the mind and dominate the emotional state. The Cryo Chamber label continues their effortless run of outstanding releases that continue to pioneer the Dark Ambient genre and ‘Advent’ embodies that streak completely. I highly recommend checking this one out so click on the link below and download this amazing album.

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Links:

https://cryochamber.bandcamp.com/album/advent

Destruktionsanstalt Resurrects A Cluster Of Menacing Tracks From Various Projects To Comprise The Superbly Written ‘Kaelder Mug’

Destruktionsanstalt is no stranger to The Dungeon In Deep Space site, as I reviewed the mighty 2018 offering, ‘Døds-hymner’. Fueled with industrialized anguish and a powerful artillery of noise, this was a pinnacle album of harsh dark ambience. Fast forward to 2020 and we find the compilation release of ‘Kaelder Mug’, an undeniable distribution of sickening atmospherics amongst several projects by Per Najbjerg Odderskov – the mastermind behind Destruktionsanstalt – that are being unearthed and brought to dark light. Destruktionsanstalt, God Cancer, and Lidane Livering set a new standard in breaching critical mass with deep ambient drones, sinister soundscapes and the harshest of noise modulations and combined, formulate a seventy two minute album that will appeal to the minds of malevolence.

The first eight songs come from pitch-shift master, Destruktionsanstalt. Combining jolting frequencies that pierce the inner ear and sustain a constant discontent for easy listening, these tracks are not just a mine field of random noises. They are randomly crafted oscillations that fuse with morbid soundscapes and narrative samples to create a meaningful soundtrack of crafty intonations. Album opener, “Familia” begins with gloomy tones in the form of layered drones with heavy distorted sequences. Voice samples tell an eerie story and it matches the music perfectly. A couple of tracks later, “Mali Spiritus” blasts off with sharp, piercing resonance and alternates between high and low decibels as if an alarm is providing an early warning for an unfamiliar doomsday. Again, a progression of audible narrations play a major role in deciding the anxious outcome of things. “Sanguinem Pressura” is nearly four and a half minutes of agonizing modulations that deliver some rabid drones and horrifying soundscapes. This is one of those tracks that are not for the faint of heart and is best played in a dark, cold place to receive its full affect. The final Destruktionsanstalt track is “Hic Sunt Dracones”. Commencing with a desolate wind field recording, the radiant, penetrating noise accents suddenly desecrate all in its path. As the wind volume picks up, so does the noise intensity. Together these sounds are mesmerizing and easily succeed at putting the listener into a catatonic-like state for its duration. Samples and various effects can be heard throughout, adding an evil value to this already mind-bending tune. The next three tracks come from the God Cancer project. Although there is still a noise intensity about those songs, there is more of a cosmic vibe to them, thrusting the listener into the farther most reaches of the harsh realms of the universe. The first track, “Midnight Distortions” contains a great dose of glitch recordings and immense pads to radiate the intensity that much more. It’s as if being sucked through a black hole and an dodging an oncoming asteroid field at the same time is unavoidable. “The City Is Alive” is like a sonic nightmare, as this seven plus minute track sees multi-layers of modulations glitch and bend endlessly, catapulting the brainwaves into an unexplained dimension. The final two tracks are from the Lidane Livering project and although these two tracks are probably more accessible than the previous, they are far from being insidious. The final track on the album, “Dunwich”, epitomizes the field recording technique and heavy use of soundscapes makes this minimalistic song a cold adventure all in itself. With the soft sways of an ocean vessel the ripple effects of passing currents, the calm-before-the-storm scenario is close at hand. Soothing drones and inaudible whispers howl in the background and without recoil, it all quietly disappears.

I’m a big fan of Destruktionsanstalt and I really enjoy the intriguing mix of dark ambient and harsh noise that this project provides on a consistent basis. With ‘Kaelder Mug’, we get a fascinating compilation of not only Destruktionsanstalt tracks, but an excellent glimps into two other amazing projects – God Cancer and Lidane Livering. Although the Bandcamp page for this release lists these tracks as part of abandoned projects, I sure hope this is not the last we’ll hear from any of these acts. If you like your Dark Ambient with a touch of harsh noises, look no further than ‘Kaelder Mug’. You can download this awesome piece of work at the link below.

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Links:

https://marbrenegre.bandcamp.com/album/kaelder-mug

https://destruktionsanstalt.bandcamp.com

https://godcancer.bandcamp.com/releases

https://lidanelivering.bandcamp.com

Fusing Lo-Fi Melodies With Binding Drones, Ataşehir Unleashes The Stunning ‘AVM’

I’ve often wondered if it’s possible for a dark ambient album to provide a sense of euphoria. While the genre is typically the subject matter of dismal, apocalyptic setting or doomed, deep space missions, lighter sentiment can certainly be ascertained, albeit through equally grim music. Such is the case for the latest release by Ataşehir called, ‘AVM’ – a soundtrack (of sorts) that describes a single days worth of events in a shopping mall. It’s a fairly unique theme, with quirky song titles, that stretches the boundaries of dark ambience into a more jubilant state. Let’s examine these peculiar tracks more closely.

“Your Message Woke Me Up In The Middle Of The Night And I Couldn’t Get Back To Sleep” commences with a somber energy like no other. Although at first it seems like you’re drifting through space in a motionless void, cold nebulas and other space phenomena begin to flash by you in a silent instant. Narration samples are barely audible, but make their presence felt as the tide changes to a darker tone through fierce drones. The last minute and a half introduces beautifully toned guitars that play a ceremonial chord before fading out. “A Slight Feeling Of Euphoria As We Entered The Place Where Everything Is Shiny And New” has a nostalgic feel too it, as the dreamy keyboards play a 80’s synthwave groove and multiple layers of luminous synths provide a lush atmosphere. “The Had The Right Size But The Wrong Color And This Triggered Something In Me” is an introspective piece with retro synth tones and more spots of barely audible narrations. There is a slight echo throughout this whole track that gives it a slightly cold and grim feel. “Leaving The Cinema To An Empty Food Court, We Believed The World Was Ours Or At Least Could Be” has a soft, cinematic texture that emits volumes of emotions. From the slight reverberation that are taking place in the background, to the keyboard leads that are as melodic as they are harmonious, this track builds up slowly and has a long fade out as well – stretching out whatever emotive state is present here. “This Is My Ice Cream And Yes You Can Have Some” is a minimalistic piece that places layers of beautiful drones at the helm, and then builds wonderful melodies around them. This track also has a nostalgic vibe that will take your memory back to yesteryear, as the quintessential arrangements play in looping pattern until they slowly fade out. “A Cold Breeze Blew Through The Smoking Area And I Shivered For A Second” is a bit of a serene offering with a space-like synth presence as well as an obscure looping sound that is peculiar to say the least. “The Wait For The Elevator Seemed Like An Eternity, Our Lives Encapsulated In That Moment” begins with a smooth keyboard arrangement that is backed by layers of harrowing drones and obscure soundscapes. Alluring keyboard compositions are the standout on this one and it’s probably my favorite track on the album. Cryptic voices, haunting guitar riffs and mesmerizing loops account for some of the additional things that make this a standout offering. “Outside Shake Shack” may seem like randomly played notes at first, but after listening to the melodic contribution that the instrumentation has to offer, this is such an elegant track that just isn’t long enough. “While Lost In The Otopark We Felt A Sudden Sense Of Our Own Mortality And It Was Beautiful” starts right away with warm drone sounds while faint instrumentation can be heard in the background. As that looping sound slowly crescendos into a more audible arrangement, additional drones are added to provide a thick layer of sound and uncompromising atmosphere. “Theme From AVM” is a minimalistic drone showcase as congenial sounds modulate warm tones throughout this simplistic but necessary track. The final track on the album is “Epilogue”. Although this is another minimalistic offering, drones are traded in for looping keyboard arrangements that are slightly discordant, but at the same time played in a pattern that is memorable yet slightly disturbing.

Ataşehir has found a common ground between dark ambient and euphoric music and ‘AVM’ provides the perfect platform for those results. Combining keyboards, synths, guitars and soundscapes to take the listener on an everyday nostalgic journey, ‘AVM’ is one of those albums that can be listened to over and over again. Each time I’ve played this, I’ve come across small nuances and subtleties that weren’t previously noticed and that says a lot about the effort that was put into this release. I highly recommend checking out this album so please support this artist by downloading ‘AVM’ from the link below.

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Links:

https://sumatranblack.bandcamp.com/album/avm

Diaspora Psichica’s ‘Eprom’, Interprets The Horrific And Unhinged Ordeals Of The Artificial Intelligence Era

We’ve all seen the movie; an artificial intelligence (AI) being of some sort turns against its maker or civilization and provokes all sorts of havoc. A glitch in the system causing a reactionary output that has nullified all previous code and syntax, is now enemy number one. If you’ve not seen the movie, I’m sure you’ve read the book or have watched the TV show or at least have envisioned a scenario similar to this. In the computer age, things like this aren’t supposed to happen. Systems and components are presumed to work and function as designed. Even if there is a bug or malfunction, a failsafe is typically written to prevent the devastating effect of a hostile machine takeover. On Diaspora Psichica’s latest album, ‘Eprom’, a ghastly nightmare unfolds that is the equivalent to a systematic meltdown of frenzied proportions.

At the commencement of this album is the eccentric “Trasmisson”. Luminous sound effects race hysterically from one speaker to another as if the system startup is commanding an explicit set of code from memory. However, the narrative throughout the track repeats the same seven words over and over again, exhibiting a glitch in the system. Cosmic sounds and noises provide further evidence of a system failure, as this track finally ends, never completing the startup process. “Vision” begins with daring, low-end drones and minimalist but vibrant synth tones that are eerie and perplexing. More systematic narratives commence – a few words at a time – as if providing clues to a code. “Equilibrium” starts with a bizarre synth wave loop as if the balance of AI and Human intelligence is stuck in a type of EPROM, unable to be erased, and now must work together somehow to overcome this disaster. A deep voice can be heard providing details of their predicament. Although the voice is human-like, it definitely represents the machine. “Daleth” commences with industrial synth loops and samples, and a few oddities thrown in the mix. A few wandering drones fade in and out of the mix while a cryptic narrative repeats the same eight words over and over again. Coincidentally, each word starts with the letter D. Without warning, the track suddenly fades out. Next up is “Vertigo”, with pounding drones and enough pulverizing looping sounds to cause a panic. Searing high-pitched synth tones race through the speakers at several different random times to keep this track compelling and aggressively dark. “Afternum” is a short track of bleak drones that sound as if they are slowly breathing. Maybe this is the AI finally coming to life due to the continued interaction with human intelligence. Random thoughts regenerate at the end of the track in vocal patterns that sound straight out of a horror movie. “Hysteresis Human Mind” is the most sinister track on the album as the monotonous drones are austere in nature as well as the jumbled sound effects placed throughout. The humanoid narration – matched with this music – is completely frightening, and it continues the same format as previous tracks, in that it repeats the same few words over and over again. The final track on the album, “Thelema” is completely different from the rest of the tracks, containing an astonishing drum beat to go along with sound effects placed in a melodic pattern. Synthesized narrations play a key part in this track as well, giving it that futuristic – but at the same time, retro – feel to it. This is the perfect track to summarize this intelligent but disturbing album.

Diaspora Psichica have created a monumental album in ‘Eprom’. Although this album was recorded a few years back, it was recently brought to my attention and I’ve enjoyed this album very much. I’m very much looking forward to hearing more from this artist and I dig their unique style and quality. ‘Eprom’ is available as a FREE DOWNLOAD from the link below, so do yourself a favor and add this amazing album to your collection.

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Links:

https://diasporapsichica.bandcamp.com/album/eprom