Arbadax Consumes An Eccentric Headspace On The Enthralling, ‘Yithian’ Release

Although only having a short endeavor in the realm of Dungeon Synth, Arbadax has already produced five captivating albums that dive into the mythos of ancient ventures and Medieval lore. On the latest outing ‘Yithian’, Arbadax submerges into a Lovecraftian world of horror and intrigue over ten astonishing tracks that become the outlet for fantasy and chicanery.

The album boldly commences with “Vortex Of Time”, a synth dirge that intricately weaves peculiar harmonies and momentous ambient tones. Complemented with a tribal-like beat, the overall obscure melody loops infinitely while soundscapes develop random clusters of sonic sound structures. This is just the arcane lead off track that this album needs to push through this collection of arsenic hymns. Following that amazing introduction is “Disembodied Consciousness”, a merger of enigmatic synth chops and sinister acoustic guitar riff that spreads its proverbial angst for the duration of this haunting track. “Projection” begins with a soothing radiance that is more inline with traditional Dungeon Synth, and contains a melodic ambience that resonates deep within the soul. Thumping percussion bits adds a mournful characteristic of impenetrable battles. Esoteric sound effects complete the odyssey of this track, creating a bleak adventure like no other. “A Strange Existence” starts with thick and obtrusive keyboard effects before a cleaner synth emerges, adding a cryptic layer of effulgence to the overall sound. Moments of synthwave excellence can be heard throughout, as this track continues a sonic build until it’s conclusion. “Disturbed Visions” initiates a dreamy synth sound that suffocates the listener with a thick, brooding lead that emulates a tone that can be heard from underwater or a far off distance. Various synth leads compete for auditory space as they weave amongst themselves with assorted flare and cadence. “Upon The Horror” is an edgy piece that contains whimsical keys and tense buildup, as this faster-than-normal paced journey develops into a haunting forest synth monument. “Aeon-Dead Black Gulf” is like a nighmarish scene as random pulses of energy create a series of cosmic pulses that rage out of control before suddenly shifting into a classic synthwave anthem. Sounding more like a track from an 80’s horror movie soundtrack, this is probably my favorite track on the album. “Down From The Stars” showcases an industrial ambient beginning before settling into a malevolent drone, and then ultimately fusing into a consoling synth piece that is more in line with Forest synth (with a touch of comfy synth as well). “Scattered Echoes” is a light-hearted song with modulated sound effects and a light drone in the background. Delicate guitar melodies add a sense of ease, as this is one of the lighter (and warmer) tracks in this collection. The final track is also the longest one on the album. “Abyss Of Sleep” is nearly eight and a half minutes long and borders on the edge of strangeness and synth wizardry. Mostly consisting of minimalistic keyboard chops, there is a looping bass sound that is quite amusing and works well in conjunction with the various synth manipulations that take place throughout. This is definitely an interesting piece of music and fits right in as the closing element of this bizarrely astonishing album.

With five albums released in just a year and a half of time, Arbadax is quite the busy artist and has done an excellent job of producing material that is memorable and that successfully translates awesome stories into masterful Dungeon Synth songs. On latest effort, ‘Yithian’, Arbadax summons the spirit of Lovecraft and renders a fascinating tale into a spectacular audial escapade that eclipses the Dungeon Synth genre and ventures into other musical territories. This is a wonderful album that I recommend to fans of both Dungeon Synth and the Lovecraftian universe. Please check it out at the link below and show your support for this enigmatic artist.

Please Like/Follow my blog so that you’ll get first hand updates every time I post a review. Thanks for visiting the Dungeon!!

Links:

https://arbadax.bandcamp.com/album/yithian

https://linktr.ee/Arbadax

Eyre Transmissions XIX: Multi-Instrumentalist Baerdcyn, Invites Us To His Dungeon

These days, there are all forms and styles of Dungeon Synth. There is certainly a variance that aims to please not only the seasoned Dungeon Synth fan, but also for those that are curious if this genre is the right fit for them. One artists that has taken a different approach to curating a unique brand of Dungeon Synth is Baerdcyn. A fantastic multi-instrumentalist, Baerdcyn intertwines a plethora of soulful sounds and consoling ambience to create Acoustic Dungeon Synth. With a handful of beautifully textured albums, Baerdcyn invites us into his world to discuss his particular brand of music, his instruments and well, all things Baerdcyn.

1. I really appreciate you taking the time for this interview. How has 2022 been for you so far?

Not too bad! Busy with work and life, but that’s never a bad thing.

2. When did you get the idea for the Baerdcyn project and what were some of the objectives you sought to achieve musically?

Baerdcyn started in late fall of 2020 when my friends pushed me to play Dark Souls for the 1st time. I have always had the idea of making “Acoustic Dungeon Synth” before having owned a lute and some recorders at the time from my love of historical renaissance classical music. I never brought the idea to fruition however until I heard the menu theme and the “Firelink Shrine” theme from the 1st Dark Souls. When I 1st heard these tracks, they brought to me a feeling of orchestral Dungeon Synth. I promptly made a cover of the “Firelink Shrine” theme (Which has yet to see the main light of day) and from that recording process is what led to the ideas behind my debut.

3. What’s the meaning behind the name Baerdcyn?

So the name’s meaning itself was a complete accident. And for the record for all you reading, the pronunciation is (Bard-Koon) the “ae” is supposed to be an “æ” but alas I didn’t know how to get it to work on my phone at the time. The “y” in Old English is pronounced kind of like a cross between “ew” (in “ew that’s gross”) and “oo” (in “Racoon”). Back to the meaning of the name, I originally just made it because it sounded cool, but in the long run, you could take the modern english “Bard” and the Old English “Cyn” , meaning kin or offspring, to make a meaning of “The Bard’s Kin” or a little more interpretively, “The Son of a Bard”

4. You play a variety of instruments on your albums and you seem to excel at them all. Are you self-taught or do you have any formal training?

I am self taught on all my bardic instruments. I play a few more non-bardic instruments, but the only I play that I was professionally taught was saxophone.

5. Can you give us a run down on some of the instruments that you play?

In terms of the Bardic stuff, I can play the Lute, Lyre, Classical Guitar (along with steel string and 12 string steel string guitars), Celtic Harp, Mandolin, Bowed Psaltery, Hammered Dulcimer, Hurdy Gurdy (which I don’t believe is on a recorded release…yet), Irish Penny Whistle, Bass Recorder, Soprano Recorder, Kalimba, and Tongue Drum. As for the non-bardic instruments, I play Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Baritone Saxophones, Banjo (ragtime jazz), fretless banjo (old time folk), Bass Guitar, -very minimal- Electric Guitar and classical organ.

6. Does being professionally trained in the saxophone make it easier for understanding and playing other instruments?

I find that it makes the wind instruments I play a lot easier as it boils down to being a saxophone with less keys on it, in a simple sense.

7. What’s the backstory on your love for the saxophone? Can you read sheet music as well? If so, do you make tabs of your own music?

When I was in 5th grade, so about 11 years ago, I ended up signing up for school band and playing saxophone. As for the sheet music, I do read sheet music, but I do not make sheet music for Baerdcyn. My recording process is very improvisational, so transcribing the pieces to sheet music would make an extra step that I don’t really feel like doing.

8. Thematically and musically, you fit right in with the Dungeon Synth community. However, would you classify it as anything else

I have always believed I have sat in the realm of Dungeon Synth. Since day one, I have called myself “Acoustic Dungeon Synth” or “Dungeon Synth Unplugged”

9. Take us back to ‘The Cave Of Time’. What was the concept behind this album and was this your first recording experience or were you involved with anything prior?

So this was my 1st official recording experience. I did however have a very short lived run of a dungeon synth -with acoustic instruments too- audio drama called “The Tale of Bjorngar” which exists in it’s unfinished state on my bandcamp. The theme came from when I recorded the cover of “Firelink Shrine”. I had realized that the reverb patch I had made, when picking up myself wetting my lips, sounded like drops of water in a cave. Thus the cave theme was born.

https://baerdcyn.bandcamp.com/album/the-cave-of-time

10. In the Bandcamp notes for ‘Heritage Of The Bay’, you dedicated the album to your Grandfather. Was he a big supporter of your musical endeavors or did he have a major influence in your life?

He has and still does in both. My Grandfather is one of the leading causes of my love for nature. Living in the coastal salt swamps of southern New Jersey, we often would, and still do, go to the bay or the meadows. As a child we would spend hours just cleaning up trash and tidying up and then followed it up with a walk through the area looking for “treasures” anything from clamshells to oyster shells, long decomposed crab shells to cool rocks, driftwood to barnacle encrusted goods. You name it, I loved it. He is a major influence on my life, and keeps me going to this day. He also always gets an artist copy of my tapes when I have one to spare. You’ll most likely read this Pop, so thanks. Thanks for everything and all that you do.

https://baerdcyn.bandcamp.com/album/heritage-of-the-bay

11. ‘Fantasy February’ was a unique album, in that it contained short snippets of music. We’re these ideas that were never transformed into longer tracks or were these short pieces intentional.

So Fantasy February originally started as a drawing prompt challenge. I then added the idea of making a song for each picture I drew and thus the idea was made. The minute-per-song run time was due to the fact that my main platform of interaction being instagram didn’t allow videos longer than a minute at the time.

https://baerdcyn.bandcamp.com/album/fantasy-february

12. Speaking of snippets, you post a lot of videos on Instagram that showcases your amazing talent. Are these videos improvised?

All of the little snippets on my Instagram are improvised, yes. Being trained in Saxophone I took a deep interest in funk and jazz improv with that, and it has carried over into my newest field of music.

13. I really loved the concept of ‘Meditations Of Forests Old’. Have you considered creating a video for the main track?

I have! The release was originally to be recorded field recording style in my local trail, and then a video of a walk through was to be made to accompany it. It never came to be, but I still have the hopes of going back and doing such a thing.

https://baerdcyn.bandcamp.com/album/meditations-of-forests-old

14. On one of your latest releases, ‘The White Oak’, I sense some extreme somberness with these tracks. We’re these written to embellish a particular mood or experience?

Nope. I just have a knack for that somber feel, so I roll with it.

https://baerdcyn.bandcamp.com/album/the-white-oak

15. Your album covers are a mix of photos and drawings/sketches. Do you do all of the artwork yourself? If so, is there a story behind the development of the various characters?

I do all the art and photography myself. The Characters on the cover of my debut was just a wizard I drew, but I -might- have plans to embellish on him in the future, and the character on the inside of the J-Card from my split with Elminster is one of my friends DnD characters. Besides that not much thought goes behind the characters.

16. Speaking of your split will Elminster, that recording was amazing! Do you have any plans for future collaborations?

Not that I know of, no.

17. Do you have a goal in mind for the amount of releases you produce each year or do you release albums once you’ve completed a concept or theme and then move on to the next?

I release as I finish. Most of my themed releases start coming to mind about halfway through the previous release, but I like to release things as soon as it’s done. I absolutely hate sitting on things longer than I have to.

18. I really appreciate this interview opportunity and I’m truly a fan of your art! Any closing comments for those that may be reading this?

Thanks for having me here and thank you all that support. It means the world to me that I can bond with so many people so far away over our love for nerd music. It truly baffles me how wonderful of a community we have, and I love you all. Thank you all for everything you’ve done. Keep trekking through that dungeon, we are all gonna make it. One day or another.

Links:

BC: https://baerdcyn.bandcamp.com

YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCnrgbbkxDrBfsukpzw2XJBg

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/baerdcyn/

Conducive Produces An Immense Image Of Controlled Turbulence On ‘Global Makeshift Wounds’

Like all other genres of music, Dark Ambient comes in all shapes and sizes (figuratively speaking). A variety of sub-genres keeps this obscure pallet of music interesting and unique – to say the least. One of my favorite offsprings of Dark Ambient, is Drone. I know what you’re thinking; isn’t Drone and Dark Ambient the same? Should it be in a separate category all together? In my opinion, yes, it should be separate because there are subtleties and intricate nuances that render them differently. Drone is more experimental, minimalistic and sometimes, hard to tolerate (by those that aren’t quite familiar with this style of music). However, there is beauty amongst the controlled chaos of Drone music and it’s contents are entirely open for interpretation. As for me, I love listening to Drone music while working, reading and when I need something in the background to help me concentrate. One up and coming artist that has caught my attention is Conducive, and with their debut album, Global Makeshift Wounds, out now on Veinte 33 Records, I’m happy to report that is some of the most trance-inducing Drone music I’ve heard in a while.

This forty minute turbulent broadcast is cleft into two parts. Separately, they stand on their own as narrative transmissions that detail a dark, scenic reality that plays into the senses and provides the essence of real-world chaos. However, together, they fuse a building chronological that portrays a dismal landscape of time, brutal machinery and the inconspicuous element that spews “we are not in control.” On the surface, “Global Makeshift Wounds #1” begins with the every day sounds of a hurried life, perpetuating that we have a certain control of our destiny. However, underneath, esoteric droning commences, setting into motion a controlled, chaotic modulation of tempestuous energy of impending doom. As the volume of this monstrous effort escalates above the existence of all other natural sounds, a peculiar comfort begins to exist, taking over the listeners ability to grasp the humbleness of existence. As we continue to sink into this eclectic drone, small subtleties begin to emit imperfections with the machinery, causing angst and misguided nervousness. There is nothing that can be done, other than to give in to the systematic noise and become one with the grueling soundscapes. Just as you begin to get use to this setup, we get a semi-abrupt ending, providing a well deserved break from the pandemonium. It’s mind-blowing how this didn’t feel like twenty minutes at all. “Global Makeshift Wound #2” commences with audial samples of people moving about as if it’s part of their daily routine. Like there is no care in the world or fears of what’s to come, the calming pattern of their ordinary commotion is soon to be preempted by another dose of overworked machinery that has been put through the rigors of systematic stress and pressed beyond their capabilities with no regard for its malevolent impact of failure. By the five minute mark of this track, the exhaustive industrialism materializes in full spectrum, drowning out the majority of the quotidian annoyances. There is a magnificent power that is portrayed by these layers of drones that contributes to the overall mesmerizing output of this track, achieving a substantial audial radiance in the process. At around the eleven minute mark, a tranquillizing dose of white noises are mixed in and duplicated about a minute later, producing a menacing buzz that can be a bit terrifying for those that are not use to this kind of ambient projection. At around fifteen minutes in, all hell begins to break loose, as the machines struggle to maintain form, creating a disruptive audial flow In frequency and initiating an reprehensible cacophony of destruction. At the end of the track, the machinery gives in its catastrophic demise, diminishing all sound abruptly.

This year is shaping up to the the breakout year for Drone music. As one of the more minimalistic elements of the Dark Ambient community, Drone music is on the rise and more releases of this kind are piquing my interest more than ever. Conducive is an amazing artist that can now be added to that list and ‘Global Makeshift Wounds’ is bound to make an impact. For a debut release, this album covers a lot of ground, in particular with the audial arrangements and the exceptional production. I highly recommend checking out this album and you can support the artist by downloading it from the link below.

Please Like/Follow my blog so that you’ll get first hand updates every time I post a review. Thanks for visiting the Dungeon!!

Links:

https://veinte33records.bandcamp.com/album/global-makeshift-wounds

https://conducivemusic.bandcamp.com/releases

Nachtjäger Fortifies The Aphotic Path For ‘The Eternal Traveler’

It’s a tranquil Sunday afternoon and I’ve decided to take a little time to catch up on some reading, as well as to focus on my next Dungeon Synth review. Since I love to listen to music while I read, I put on ‘The Eternal Traveler’ by Nachtjäger. It was the perfect arrangement, as the somber vibes emitted from this album played in to the harrowing novel that I was reading. This near seventy minute opus consists of eleven tracks that range in a myriad of synth varieties, albeit remaining steadfast in the realm of Dungeon Synth. The result is an amazing adventure through bleak – but alluring – domains, with minimalistic modulations and calming synth leads.

“My Watchtower In The Darkness” commences with a darkened intonation that would be fitting for a Medieval crusade. Slightly grim, yet composed in a way that exudes strife and victory. With a dirge-like cadence, this is such an emotional song to kick things off. “Crystalline Caverns” is one of my favorite songs on the album with its eerie vibe and haunting ambience that is detailed throughout. Limpid synth leads establishes a transparent connection with the layers of bleak atmospherics, causing a ritualistic effect. “Traveling On Spectral Vessels” once again changes the vibe of the album, giving off a lighthearted appeal that is enough to sooth a savage beast. Well written, there is a plethora of melodic parts and they are woven together seamlessly in an orchestral fashion. “Woodland Sanctuary” is a chilling abode with minimalistic drones and sparse synth leads. However, this approach is extremely effective, especially with creating an emotional sound of theatrical proportions. “Insights Born From Ashes” again alters the audial course and gives forth a Renaissance-era anthem with gothic undertones and slightly reverberated keys. “Lost Scripts Of Old” is an enticing piece that includes a psychedelic vibe and clean synth leads that are reminiscent of the Comfy Synth sub-genre. There are several layers of keys that create a delicate harmony and the outcome is quite mesmerizing. “Ancestral Homelands” takes us back to a darker sound, almost emitting a Black Metal-style song introduction. However, whimsical effects elicit a funereal vibe and concludes with a buildup of synth leads that has a massive sound. “Winds Tell Of A Dying Age” is constructed like a saddened symphony, with a reluctant pace and a passionate arrangement that is redolent of somber times and post-war struggles. Without a doubt, this is the most elegant track on the album and another of my personal favorites. “Astral Signs In The Northsky” is a besieging song that combines many elements of ambient music and Dungeon Synth variants. The slow climb and descent of the musical scale is fused with eccentric synth effects, producing a slightly lurid sound that ends rather abruptly. “Heralds Of The New Dawn” is a dreamy little dirge with retrospective effects and a heartfelt arrangement that combines rhythmic tones and atmospheric expression. The final track on the album is a majestic masterpiece. “Transcendental Relics” is a twenty three and a half minute long treasure that integrates soothing ambience and elongated synth tones is an epic symphonic composition. There are bits of synthwave, orchestral arrangements, and obscure melodies throughout that definitely keep this long player interesting and most of all, relevant to the theme of the rest of the album. With a substantial amount of reverb, this song sounds really thick and quixotic, demanding multiple listens with it’s addictive appeal. This is my favorite song on ‘The Eternal Traveller’ and such a beautiful way to finalize this exhilarating album.

Nachtjäger has successfully produced an amazing Dungeon Synth experience with ‘The Eternal Traveller’. With tracks that transfer the lister to majestic dimensions of castles, Medieval setting and mystical elegance, this album is a spectacle of synth amazement that resists genre tags and symbolizes musical growth in the community. If you’ve not heard this album, I highly recommend checking it out and please support the artist by downloading it from the link below.

Please Like/Follow my blog so that you’ll get first hand updates every time I post a review. Thanks for visiting the Dungeon!!

Links:

https://nachtjaeger.bandcamp.com/album/the-eternal-traveler

The Nebula Breviary – A Voyage Through The Black Hole With Ithildin Tape Production

Welcome to The Nebula Breviary! For starters, I’m not sure if this will be a continuous column or just a one-off publishing. In either case, I wanted to create something where I could spotlight an artist that is involved in a variety of projects, with a steady amount of releases. I couldn’t think of a better entity than Ithildin Tape Production. The home of Dungeon Synth maestro Elminster, Ithildin Tape Production is the mainstay of many other activities that performs in the Dungeon Synth realm and beyond. Enjoy these summary reviews of some of the many projects from Ithildin Tape Production!

1. The Owl Knight – Chamber Of The Starplotter

One thing I love about this release, is that it covers a lot of ground although being very compositionally minimalistic. This assortment of flavors included winter synth, raw Dungeon Synth and nominal chip tune without the cheerful undertones. The constant tape hiss gives off a nostalgic vibe and the flow from track-to-track is well thought out. You’ll definitely be reminiscing through retrospective Medieval content and this truly sounds like something that could be played in a deep, dingy dungeon. This one is worth checking out and adding it to your collection is a must.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/chamber-of-the-starplotter

2. Elminster – Caern Mist

Elminster, the flagship project of Ithildin Tape Production, sends a mesmerizing reminder as to why this is one of the best, traditional Dungeon Synth projects out right now. ‘Caern Mist’ is an exceptional release that features a range of dynamic orchestrations and light-hearted patterns that are enough to sooth the soul. These lengthy tunes drift in slow motion as if waiting for the seasons to change or the lapse in light as day fades to nocturnal bliss. Beautifully produced and elegantly composed, this album is a true testament of the mature path traveled for Elminster.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/caern-mist

3. Muzgash – Hymn Of Hithlum

This is one of those recordings that you can turn on and then get lost in its vast atmospherics. A soothing ambience starts this twenty one minute long track and then it faintly reforms into a juggernaut of ritualistic beats and hypnotic loops that will keep you sedated for the duration on the track. Hints of Dungeon Synth effects are scattered throughout in a tasteful manner, as to not take away from the complete submersion of this audial spectacle. I would love to hear more from this project, especially if this is the material we have to look forward to.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/hymns-of-hithlum

4. Mahomet Renatus – Ire Of The Crescent Reborn

‘Ire Of the Crescent Reborn’ is an interesting blend of lo-fi Black Metal and sparse Dungeon Synth undertones. Minimalistic in approach, these three tracks complete a 20 minute cycle of trance-inducing wall of noise that is more of a controlled chaos that an all out blitzkrieg. The drums shift between blast beats and industrial thumps that maintains a deafening cadence. Overall a good release but the faster parts definitely stand out and create a whirlwind of noise that’s addictive and refreshing.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/ire-of-the-crescent-reborn

5. In Dusk’s Embrace – Earth End’s Pantheon

Atmospheric, primitive and seductive are a few words that come to mind while spinning ‘Earth End’s Panthron’. This thirty four minute opus is a single-track, tour de force of atmospheric black metal that is a melting pot of twisted & sinister riffs, ambient textures and grainy vocals that redirects the listener to early incantations of icy cold Black Metal. Other than a quaint acoustic intro and outro, this track procures a relentless pace and delivers top quality low fidelity music. I highly recommend this recording for those that love that old school necro sound.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/earth-ends-pantheon

6. Moss Keep – The Curtain Of Time

‘The Curtain Of Time’ exhibits two long-players of primordial Dungeon Synth with the essence of Medieval yearnings. Complete with hisses, cracks & pops of ancient recordings, the music leans on the side of melancholic compositions with somber soundscapes and a passion for mellow, emotive terrain. With both tracks extending beyond the thirteen minute mark, these depressive dirges are best heard on a dark, dreary day where emptiness is of the essence. This is a very entertaining release and amongst my favorites by Moss Keep.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/the-curtain-of-time

7. Howling Mire – Answering The Hidden Summons

‘Answering The Hidden Summons’ is like an album of distraught ellegies, assembled for those mournful souls lost in ancient battles. The keyboard work throughout this album is amazing and truly showcases a sophisticated effort from the Ithildin Tape Production camp. Complete with background hisses to supplement the overall dismal ambience, these four tracks are over before you know it, even though totaling almost thirty minutes worth of music. Save this one for a rainy day and it will fit right in.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/answering-the-hidden-summons

8. Dyvyná – Within The Walls Of The Promised Kingdom

From the music to the art work, this has the Renaissance era written all over it. Crisp synth leads and dreamy effects solidifies a haunting atmosphere of bright, effervescent colors. There is a slight reverb on the instrumentation as well, emitting a powerfully thick sound that aligns perfectly with the production efforts. This Dyvyná project is definitely one to look out for and an extensive catalog of music is already building up.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/within-the-walls-of-the-promised-kingdom

9. Whispers Of Umbar – Hail The Voidlord

Whispers Of Umbar is one of my favorite projects from Ithildin Tape Production. There is just something about that primitive sound that blurs the line between Dungeon Synth and Dark Ambient that brings joy to these ears. ‘Hail The Voidlord’ is a near twenty seven minute experience that is crafted in noise and brutal harmonics that produces visions of bleak landscapes and unfathomable bloodshed. By the time this insane track is over, you’ll need a nap and a chalice of spirits before your next listening experience.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/hail-the-voidlord

10. Üvegszakadás – In The Ashes Of The Fallen Empire

‘In The Ashes Of The Fallen Empire’ is a mammoth of an album, especially in regards to previous releases in the Ithildin Tape Production catalog. Almost an hour and forty minutes of granular Dungeon Synth that feels like a massive compression chamber of ghastly intonations that are sequentially summoning Medieval spirits for an upcoming apparitional raid. Haunting melodies compounded by wobbly effects and battle-ready cadences, this is an imposing outing that is sure to become a fan favorite.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/in-the-ashes-of-a-fallen-empire

11. Sorrow Of The Moon – Hávamál

‘Hávamál’ is one of six Sorrow Of The Moon demo’s released this year (thus far), each containing a single track ranging from twelve to twenty minutes of playing time. This project is a firm mashup of Elminster and Üvegszakadás, with its own production value that is gothic influenced and completely introspective. What I do love is the upbeat nature of this demo and how complete it sounds, with regards to the traditional Dungeon Synth sound. This is one that I can easily play over and over again without getting tired of it.

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/h-vam-l

12. Maeglin – Screams Of A Frozen Heart

Unlike the other Black Metal releases on Ithildin Tape Production, Maeglin infuses more distorted guitar chords and focuses on melody and song structure, instead of trance-like atmospherics. The results – at least for ‘Screams Of A Frozen Heart’ – is that it’s more focused, catchy and quite enjoyable. There are definitely some Dungeon Synth undertones, specifically in the intro and various spots throughout the release. However, they are used more of as a background discord than being the focal point of the music. This is another admirable release from ITP!

https://ithildintapeproduction.bandcamp.com/album/screams-of-a-frozen-heart

Cassettes Can Be Purchased Here:

https://ithildintapeproduction.bigcartel.com

Planet Supreme Invokes A Stellar Collision On The Ever Evolving, ‘Creation Of A Star’

Anytime I see a Cryo Chamber Label release, it’s an instant download for me. Although not always the bleakest of Dark Ambient music, one things for sure is that each album from every artist (on the label) is prepared to submerge the listener into an extravagant, cinematic voyage – beyond the infinite realms of space and the darkest depths of the oceans. Relative newcomer to the label, Planet Supreme, released their debut album last year in the form of ‘Creation Of A Star’. Providing a true soundtrack for the stages of this miraculous celestial formation, each track not only stands on their own, but together form a tale of galactic nascency. These eight tracks construct an impressive journey through the cosmos with exceptional space ambience and a quest for ethereal development.

Gentle album opener, “Cometh Night”, initially resembles the boom of a celestial bang with a crescendoing drone that fades out and and back in again. This is the birth of a star, and the imposing musical journey that will play out for the remainder of this album. Heavily reverberated pads produce a drifting motion that simulates a noiseless meander through space. As this dissolves, other ambient tones represent planetary bodies and terrestrial objects traveling in a nearby orbit. “Black Earth” ascends into eternal darkness with a rigid drone and the perfect placement of a variety of industrial soundscapes. Polished synth leads emit a slight chaotic stance while a culmination of harsh effects surround it all with effortless subtlety. A sound reminiscent of a warning alarm, prepares the adjacent area for misadventure, as hauntingly beautiful synths harmonize with ease. “Machina” commences with an assortment of mechanized effects and monstrous blurbs, as if this canticle is preparing to focus on a singular pattern or instance. Warm drones sound off with confidence and an array of keyboard effects play a solid scale, portraying a communicative effort between human and immaterial beings from distant worlds. Toward the end, a peculiar sequence and sub-harmonies create an obscure picture of bleak existence. “Hectronic Lights” is an alleviating ambient piece with soft, melodic drones and synths that play in orchestral fashion. There is a slight hissing noise in the background that shows a separation between the chaos and the comforting atmosphere of this audial adventure. “Scanners” begins at a moment in time just before the commencement of some type of discord. Starting with a low, humming sound, bits of inaudible frequencies are played, causing angst and tension. However, that is soon replaced with highly reverberated tones and synth effects, carrying forth a mission of audial bliss in a slightly hypnotic state. “Genetic Cargo” contains a vast amount of field recordings and sound effects, especially in the beginning before morphing into a mesmerizing drone. The sounds are anesthetizing to the point where you won’t want this excursion to end. A beguiling bass line in the background is a refreshing experience for this album, showing another side of this spectacular project. “Stray” commences with the crackles of a small, contained fire while modulating pulses build around it. Several synth notes are played sequentially with a small echo effect. Harsh pads and tonal order play sporadically and throughout, giving the impression of a lurking presence in the vicinity. The final track on the album is, “Above Broken Ground.” Seemingly incorporating many elements all at once, a wall of sound emits an overwhelming sensation of the final moments of a stars creativity. As if everything is finally falling into place, this climactic track showcases onerous harmonies and layers of synthwave effects that don’t let up until the final moments of this track. Ending with a singular, harsh drone, the creative efforts are finalized and another stunning celestial body is created.

Planet Supreme is a welcomed edition to the Cryo Chamber Label lineup and I hope this project is here to stay. The beautiful soars of melody and mixture of dark and light ambience already equals that of more seasoned veterans of the label. I would love to see a collaboration between Planet Supreme and Beyond The Ghost or In Quantum sometime in the future, as I feel a co-existence of either of those projects could create something beyond amazing. As for ‘Creation Of A Star’, it is a stunning release that will surely stand the test of time. Not to mention, it features one of my favorite Cryo Chamber Label album covers of 2021. If you’ve not heard this superb release yet, head on over to the link below and prepare to be absorbed into a world of chaotic beauty. I highly recommend checking it out.

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Links:

https://cryochamber.bandcamp.com/album/creation-of-a-star

Landsraad Impresses With Another Dune-Themed Juggernaut In ‘Fate; The Inevitability Thereof’

Last year was a tremendous year for the Dungeon Synth community. We saw a plethora of albums being released by a lot of our seasoned favorites, cassette releases all over the place, and a ton of new artists making their way on the scene with various intonations of the genre and gaining a stronghold of fans that typically remain loyal to the music and fascination that it brings. One of those new artists, Landsraad, was a standout in my book with the mesmerizing album ‘The Golden Path’. Paying homage to the Dune series, that album could have easily been an unreleased soundtrack to the classic movie of the same name. The album was also in my “Top 10” list for Dungeon Synth albums of 2021. Fast forward to August of this year, and we are greeted with the sophomore follow-up album, ‘Fate; The Inevitability Thereof’ and another trip back into the Dune universe. How does this album stack up to the debut? Let’s take a deeper dive into each track to find out.

From the opening progression of “A Secret Meeting//Edrics Precience”, the fantasy-based synth harmonies present a range of otherworldly emotions and melodies. Berlin School styled sequences places the listener directly in the middle of the Dune Universe, in the presence of a sandstorm of influential characters and fascinating plight. This is a beautiful album opener that respects the thematics of classic storytelling and fictional magnificence. “Face Dancer” immediately opens up with a bold modulated synth sound and an array of leads that build off each other, but always seem to be in unison in this heralded composition. “A Body In The Sand” is a light-hearted track that flows like a brisk breeze over vast mounds of endless sand, while the heat radiates off of its bright surface, producing hints of valuable spice. As if moving in slow motion, the droning nature of this track will leave one breathless and wanting more. “The Lion Throne//Walking The Path” brings a musical shift toward darker, somber tones and audacious radiance. Bringing back a classic, synthwave sound that will resonate with fans of 80’s electronica, the rhythmic succession of tone in this track leads to bleak adventures in euphony as imaginative excursions play out in the subconscious. The melodic journey really picks up with “Hayt”. The opening harmony is memorable and would last a lifetime (if I had my way). As one of my favorite songs on this album, it truly transcends categorization and could easily be included in a motion picture soundtrack. The sequential intonations casually ascend into a world of honor and dignity. “Stoneburner” continues on with the same emotive spirit of the previous track and the monumental music it contains creates an imposing force of majestic synth wizardry. This is another treasured track that is sure to gain multiple listens from fans of electronic music in general. Truly a masterclass in exquisite synth compositions. “Scytale (feat. Thanaphos)” returns to the buoyant sounds of the first several tracks, with dreamy passages and warm droning ambience in the background. This is an enlightening foray into more peaceful times and the arrangements are just a bundle of ear candy, full of tonal flavors that can’t be resisted. “Abomination Pt. 2” is a ballad of sorts, with minimal use of Berlin School sequences and deep pounding synth pads that thicken the sounds of this semi-upbeat performance. It’s as if a daunting trip to find a land of paradise, finally played out in the favor of the songs protagonist, proving the journey was worth the battle to get there. “All Things Yet To Be Said” is another noteworthy achievement that includes crisp, Berlin School patterns, wavy celestial drones and resolute synth leads that describe a drama unfolding with only the use of alluring arrangements. “Bijaz//Oracle” is an introspective offering that features an ornate harmony arrangement that is kind of hidden behind a wall of reverberated chaos. However, if you listen closely, you’ll be able to find a soothing culture of tones that are simply amazing. The albums final song, “A Path Broken//Walking Into Dune” is a breathtaking display of conclusive audial proponents that combine the efforts of the previous songs into an awe-inspiring summation. Multiple layers of haunting melody calmly collide with synth leads that extend beyond the reaches of space, yet gather all of the sounds into a cluster of tonal perfection. This track is such a a wonderful outro to this chapter of Landsraad’s Dune Universe and leave plenty of room for more innovative synth compositions to come in the future.

Landsraad is such an amazing project and it’s hard to categorize the true genre of the music contained within the highly impressive (but small) catalog of album. Of course there is a traditional Dungeon Synth influence but Landsraad also incorporates classic synthwave, Berlin School, soaring harmonies, and an amazing theme to produce a signature sound that can’t be denied. ‘Fate; The Inevitability Thereof’ is a thoroughbred recording of the highest caliber and just may end up on my year end Top 10 list. I highly recommend checking this album out as it has so much variety to offer. Also, the songwriting is out of this world and will surely peak the interest of those that love a good science fiction themed musical outing.

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Links:

https://landsraad.bandcamp.com/album/fate-the-inevitability-thereof

Caldon Glover Delivers A Ritualistic Incantation of Celestial Malevolence On ‘Death Mycelium’

Earlier this year, I reviewed an amazing album by Monstruwacan. It’s based on the sorrowful concept of grief and poverty and project mastermind, Caldon Glover excelled at creating a dismal state that listeners can dwell in and become at one with the music and theme. I wouldn’t necessarily call that album a side project, but it’s one that relates with the horrors of mankind and societal shortcomings. As for his main Dark Ambient project, Caldon Glover plunges into the very heart of mayhem and polarizing destruction with the harsh sounds of Indistrialized ambience and deep tonal modulations that produce a sinister atmosphere of gruesome discovery. On his latest album, ‘Death Mycelium’, he presents 5 tracks of violent commotion that weighs much more on the psyche than it does toward physical bloodshed. At almost an hour long, these songs send a pulverizing image of darkness and disturbing images by way of horrific drones and soundscapes. Let’s dive deeper into each of these tracks.

The ill-lighted album opener, “Gateway To The Fiber Network Deadworld”, begins with an isolated drone that sounds as if it’s drowning in frequency abandonment. Simplistic but relevant effects depict a scenery of obscure visuals and a dismal populace. As the mind starts to wander with a slow walk through destructive landscapes and architectural structures, soundscapes begin to build, increasingly becoming the dominate force in this song. Sounds of ghostly shrills begin to terrorize while hollow modulations multiple with a brutal sense of depth. It’s as if the clash between tangible disasters and deep space came to an infinite conclusion. “Sunk Into Thin Spaces” commences with several frightening tones, equaling that of the terrorizing music that plays in unison with a killing scene in a horror movie. Although a bit more minimalistic than the first track, it’s just as effective in creating a void that listeners can describe as they are falling endlessly into an abysmal pit. This song sounds like a nightmarish space disaster that has taken place far out of recollection of other beings. “Endless Worm” continues with the grimness but in a less chaotic way. Minimalist sound shift from hollow oscillations to desolate bitterness that seems perpetual. As this twelve minute song continues, deeper instances of continual drones push the boundaries of insanity. Although there is not much going on with regards to effects and soundscapes, there is something deeply disturbing with a track of this nature. Definitely one of my favorite songs on the album. Next up is “Broadcasting Calls Through Strange Winds”. The celestial launch of this intonation is like an unnatural velocity of force that is set to destroy all in its path. The deep bellows of synth pads create a reverberated sound much akin to our thoughts of what the frigid corners of the universe must sound like. At thirteen and a half minutes long, this is the second longest track on the album and is a tour de force of cosmic vacuums and the doomed pandemonium that is kept hidden within. The last four minutes is what nightmares are made out of, as if an unseeable force is pinning you down against your will and infiltrating your mind with terror and dread. The final – and longest – track on the album is, “Let Yourself Away From This Place.” At fourteen and a half minutes long, there is no denying that the bleak adventure that lay ahead will be lethargic and unbearable. Dreamy drones paint a picture of boundless turmoil and apathetic occurrences. The occasional use of percussion is a welcomed sound as it blends with the texture of the dreary soundscapes and ceaseless moments of tonal dissonance. Interestingly, the final few minutes depict a spot of hope, as warm drones enter the picture, shining a hint of light on the distant horizon. What a spectacular way to approach the final moments of this stunning album.

Caldon Glover has provided us with an array of Dark Ambient albums since 2018 and ‘Death Mycelium’ just may be his most challenging (and rewarding) album to date. There are no over-the-top cinematic tricks or indulgences, just bleak, atmospherics that takes the listener beyond imaginative realms. If you’re a fan of sinister and minimalistic Dark Ambient music, look no further than Caldon Glover. Click on the link below to download this amazing album, and check out the remainder of his discography while you’re there.

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Links:

https://caldonglover.bandcamp.com/album/death-mycelium

Serenity Flows Through Vast Medieval Fields On Ruins Of Xibalba’s ‘Gobeklitepe’

Ruins Of Xibalba, the soaring new project of Tir main man, is much more than a Dungeon Synth side project. It is an ambient adventure into outer realms, where cosmic soundscapes compliment daunting melodies and admirable song structures for an outcome of refreshing proportions. Bits of synthwave and cinematic arrangements elicit a high level release that eclipses the boundaries of many electronica genres. Mystical second album, ‘Gobeklitepe’ is an excursion through ancient mythos and compelling sacred cultures through 9 distinguished compositions that erupts in almost an hours worth of synth greatness.

Celestial album opener, “Sirius”, commences with a soothing drone that is reminiscent of gothic overtures from a classic, transcendent period. As altering tones shift like a slow flowing current of vast oceans, luminescent soundscapes and peaceful synths build a scene full of dreamy characters and endless landscapes. “Reverie” begins with a calming tone that creates a sense of relaxation and drifting timbres while utopian synth leads play somber intonations that pay homage to 80’s synthwave. Harrowing textures build into an austere arrangement that is addictive and completely mesmerizing. This is one of my favorite tracks on the album and one of the most played songs in my synth playlist. “Pedestal” is one of the shortest tracks on the album and has more of a traditional Dungeon Synth flare than the previous songs. Layers of synth leads build in crystal clear context and this beautiful little dirge is over just as it starts to create a dream state for the listener. “The Flame In The Temple” fires off on all cylinders as bombastic samples paint a picture of dread and anguish. As if a battle is looming near, this particular sound continues for a few minutes until a melodic chop begins to integrate, forming a massive sound of Medieval spirits. Alluring female vocals are added, sending this song to soaring heights and giving the listener a sensational overture of adventurous development. Additional spoken words enhance the terrain of musical endeavor, making this a supremely well rounded song. At just over ten minutes in length, “Prophesy” is the longest track on the album. Combining elements of synthwave and atmospheric effects, this song is a slow build into a captivating cinematic performance. Sonic drones and spacey keyboards fill the void as a wall of sound is created in hypnotic fashion. Representing the subtle changes that occur at dawn, “Prophesy” runs the gamut of sounds, from elongated and peaceful to melodic and grandiose. “Shaman Of The Welkin” is a change of pace, as a rhythmic drum beat leads the charge in this eerie dirge. Written in a very theatrical way, it features a gigantic orchestral sound that flows in a very emotional way. This track could very well be featured on a soundtrack of a fantasy/adventure-based movie. “Göbekli Tepe” is a whimsical outing featuring a quirky keyboard chop that plays in the background, while sounds of the orient take center stage with colorful effects and serene synth elements. “Eternal” is a daring, ambient adventure with a host of menacing soundscapes and effects. Immediately commencing with a sinister drone, mind-melding effects play sporadically, showcasing a sense of dread and endless agony. About halfway through this eight minute opus, fluid keys begin to play, opening the depth of this track like an endless black hole in deep space. It’s as if a constant storm reaping havoc on the mind and causing a depth of internal commotion. The final track on this spellbinding album is, “Reverie – Yetzer Remix Version”. For over seven minutes, we are treated to a masterful drone experience with minimalistic effects that bridge the gap of various electronic genres. With an anodyne of modulated tones, there are similarities to the original track but this remix version is a darker presentation of an already bleak performance that demands multiple listens.

This sophomore album by Ruins of Xibalba is an extremely fascinating affair and a one-of-a-kind experience. Overall, ‘Gobeklitepe’ is a consoling journey through time, space, the mind and any other relatable experience and certainly fulfills a particular destiny with thoughtful arrangements and mesmerizing cadence. Although this album was released last year, it’s still extremely relevant now and I highly recommend this for fans of ambient textures and the wonders of Medieval soundscapes. Please click on the link below to dive into this amazing adventure.

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Links:

https://ruinsofxibalba.bandcamp.com/album/gobeklitepe

Eyre Transmissions XVIII: Interview With Reticent Dark Ambient Producer, Infinexhuma

Infinexhuma is one of Dark Ambients most spectral artists. Producing a variant that captures the true essence of Dark Ambient music, while always coming up with ideas that catapult his brand of bleak atmospherics beyond comprehensible realms. Each release presents a diverse blend of haunting drones and soundscapes while fusing in intricate nuances that entertain the listeners pallet for extended moments in time. I recently had the pleasure of interviewing the audial administrator of noise terror that IS Infinexhuma. He give us the low down on the projects beginnings, influences, and what all’s to come. Hope you enjoy this as much as I did putting it together.

1. Thanks for taking the time for this interview! One thing that I’ve been wanting to know is, what does the name Infinexhuma mean and how did you come up with it for your project?

Infinexhuma refers to Infinite Exhumation, a process widely experienced by many inhabitants of this earth, a process that breeds monotony and lack of will. Around the time of the initial host death, a doorway in limbo was opened via this concept, more so a realization that this process must be broken, emphasized by the trapping within a limbo state being the most accurate example of the horrors of unbroken monotony, the journey is, was, will be the beaking. The sounds are only evidence and passive teachings channeled through this host, It is and is not music, it is and is not metaphorical, it is and is not real.

2. How did you get into Dark Ambient music and what was the influence that made you decide to start your own project?

I recall approximately 10 years ago, at the time operating a different and now defunct music project, short naps were taken during studio work. During these naps I would listen to some more subdued black metal or perhaps just throw on a horror film for the score. Later I discovered a website called darkambient.de I believe it was called, that became the go-to for the naps after that. Later of course there were multiple stages to the evolution from lightly experimenting to heavy listening to diving into field recording to eventually releasing a first album to discovering scenes etc. Learning the composition structure of such music was a long process as well, as it was new to me, not in terms of listening, but in terms of production. The energy for Infinexhuma grew while the old project died, some influences include (yes some are by the same person); Inade, Lustmord, Ark Tau Eos, S.P.K., Archon Satani, Atrium Carceri, Sjellos, Noctilucant, NERATERRÆ, Tangerine Dream, TG, Altus, Gustaf Hildebrand, John Carpenter, Deathpile, ProtoU, Sabled Sun, film scores, Yen Pox, Terra Sancta, Apocryphos, tomandandy, Enmarta, Council of Nine, A Murder of Angels, Halgrath, Alphaxone, Svartsinn, Kolhoosi 13, Dark Matter, Crawl Unit, Subklinik, Kammarheit, Keosz, Blood Box, Trepaneringsritualen, Apoptose, Beyond Sensory Experience, Raison D’être, Visions, Vestigial, Phonothek, Monocube, Phragments, Therradaemon, Nordvargr, Brighter Death Now, MZ 412, The Human Voice, Paleowolf, Ramleh, Opeth, Ulver, Enmarta, ALLSEITS, Northaunt, Hilyard, Sephiroth, Desiderii Marginis, Phurpa, Northumbria, Psychomanteum, Gnawed, and likely more. Many obscure projects have been discovered over the years, ones that would evade the objective (and often disliked by elders) classification of dark ambient. The tiers and styles and authenticity within this obscure genre could be elaborated on as my perspective and knowledge on it continues to grow and be enhanced, however this would lengthen the interview to perhaps an unhealthy limit. I later began to hit the starting point of a full circle and felt comfortable drawing influences from unrelated genres I knew more pre Infinexhuma, mostly energetically and not so much in terms of the speed and rhythms.

3. The debut album from Infinexhuma, ‘Crossing’ is a well crafted experience that easily rivals albums from more seasoned artists. How much effort and production experience went into delivering this album?

Well, in fact the real first work was Chaotic Depth, the low volume 2016 unmastered version that is, which itself took approximately three to four years of work, not much of an impact, but I believe the process of “peaking” can be reversed for some artists, some achieve the proper transmission of their message with a first production, others take several to weed out what is not to be said, Brian Williams actually said this in an interview, quite refreshing. Anyways, Crossing, the crossing state, a collection of earth captures from what we call the Pacific Northwest. Crossing took several years as well, however a period of sharp acceleration was implemented towards the end. Much of this work was guided by intricate harmonics within the field recs, which gave a solid and consistent base for workflow, and that avoided any creative blockages. This was the true state of transition between this and that world, the energy was aided by a concept I often discuss, is your visual and physical perception of music based on environment, for example Snowy Court, was an actual Snowy Court, a Japanese garden in a strong snowing winter season, aside from the of course the sounds of subtle snowfall, the energy that was there during the recording process, remains (to me) on that recording and follows all the way to the studio, providing an energy base for the track, and I believe this cannot be recreated, despite the sounds being identical, it will lack the energy. This work was mastered by the great Robert Rich.

https://infinexhuma.bandcamp.com/album/crossing

4. “Broken River” is my favorite track on that album, as it uniquely combines field recordings, drone, haunting textures and a sense of melody. What was the story behind that particular track?

As The Snowy Court, it was in fact a broken river, the first portion of rocks shuffling was traveling to the water, traveling within the break of the river, guided by subtle harmonics, messages beyond the mind. The whole album could have been better in terms of technical production as now I am vastly more advanced in this regard, but for the sake of giving credit where it is due, the “speaking” was natural, clear and very simple.

5. Do you document your own field recordings or sample from other sources?

I use 99.99% original field recordings, samples are seldom used, and if they are, their obscurity would prevent anyone from ever acquiring knowledge of the original source.

6. In 2019, you teamed up with Neraterræ for a remastering of ‘Chaotic Depth’? I can definitely hear his influence on the album but how did this exquisite teaming come about?

In fact, it was more of a gift from fellow creator NERATERRAE, I believe I had given some unused pieces of music and in exchange for this he presented to me a mastered version of this album, alongside I believe a track for a dark ambient compilation. He was featured on his personal favorite of the album, overall it was quite a pleasure to listen to and motivated me to execute a full digital release. Again, none of it thus far is what needs to be said, I could destroy all Infinxhuma material tomorrow and it would not matter, I am attached to nothing, especially material of the past that is now deemed inferior, and in my personal opinion not so good anyway.

https://infinexhuma.bandcamp.com/album/chaotic-depth-neraterr-remaster

7. On 2020’s ‘Arcade’ release, it seems like you went for a more minimalistic, retrospective sound. The results were simply amazing, in my opinion, but what were your expectations with this release?

Very true to the Infinexhuma path, yet in a realm above many of the human compulsions and matters, hence its more neutral and overseeing vibe. This release was expected to sound good, the sound was a heavy focus of this work, the depth and intricacies within the drones were (and are) one of the most fascinating things within music to me. Many planes were explored on this, a perhaps more space oriented cousin to Crossing.

https://infinexhuma.bandcamp.com/album/arcade

8. There are a variety of instruments used/heard throughout this release. What all do you play on this album – and other albums for that matter?

Arcade had some synth layers as I had not yet adopted the principle of operating on samples only, however likely some guitar, for sure some throat singing on a specific track, but as well likely many many field recordings and their most prominent harmonics brought to the frontlines.

9. Speaking of gear, can you walk us through your studio setup?

Which one? Ha, well

1) DAW/post production, I have an ASUS laptop with decent power, a large casio used as a midi controller and practice at times, Yamaha Hs8 monitors, a few focusrite interfaces, A tape dubber/player, a novation (mini) pad with midi pots, a large bass amp, a condenser mic with multiple filters, a digital reverb unit, two guitars, a V-Drum kit, some brass and wood instruments

2) Practice/Live Prep, of course many of the mentioned and those I will mention can and are often moved in between rooms, but fundamentally I have a Eurorack box, forgetting how many hp total, three Yamaha mg102 mixers (the old school ones without usb and digital effects and crap), many effects and generator pedals, passive ¼ mixer, a few dynamic microphones, a marantz 201, a Roland SP-404 SX multiple (actual) drum pieces, a large collection of carefully selected windchimes, more wood instruments, bells, singing bowls, a Behringer Neutron synth and one more mackie mix8 (not the sturdy VLZ construction). Of course a soldering station for minor repairs and eurorack builds, contact microphones.

3) Mobile, I often use the mackie mixer when recording in tunnels or bunkers (if accessible enough to bring power as well. In my car I have constantly my Sony PCM D-100 for intricate and high quality (safe terrain as I’ve killed a few) field recs, a Zoom H-1 for more rugged and rough locations, quick on the fly recs, and as well to be used in conjunction with the Roland CS-10EM (recommended to me by Gnawed) binaural earphones/microphones for unorthodox binaural recs as I use them in reverse, thus far at least. Next, I carry a Zoom H3-VR for not the most accurate or heavy duty ambisonic work, but interesting nonetheless after decoding, A gopro with a special discontinued Sennheiser MKE-2 underwater microphone and another deeper diving somewhat shabby hydrophone for some cool underwater stuff. A tablet for on the fly Hexen Modular patches, to be used with a smaller JBL cylindrical sound bar, as well a larger JBL ONE portable rechargeable “PA” speaker.

10. Back to the music, on last year’s amazing release, ‘Frontier’, you have a variety of guest musicians that provide some captivating input for several tracks. Did you have a particular sound or theme in mind when working with these talents?

Perhaps only for the Blood Box collaboration, I have always had a very special appreciation for Blood Box and much admiration for their smooth execution of the dark and light mixture throughout their work. This was what I was seeking on our collaboration. Minimalism was sought out for the CEKE collab, and energy for the NERATERRAE one, all I believe were excellent works.

https://infinexhuma.bandcamp.com/album/frontier

11. I have to ask you about “In The End”. It’s so different from everything else that you’ve released, yet sounds as if it fits right in with the theme of the album. Is this a direction you may be interested in going in with this project or perhaps under another name?

I have huge respect for those that are dedicated and naturally immobile on a specific stylistic path, however as the journey continues, I become more aware of how this is difficult, and not needed for me. They are all artifacts, just sent through a host, a messenger that will one day go back to dust, some artifacts will be slow and brooding, some will be destructive, some will be energetic and within rhythmic structure. There will be more.

12. On your YouTube channel, you have a lot of live performance videos uploaded. This is something that’s not quite common in the Dark Ambient community (yet). How is it pulling off a Dark Ambient show while keeping it creative?

Many live works tend to stray from typical dark ambient, but at times have been very true to the exact style. Live is a heavy opener of creative doors, a heavy generator of energy, a powerful opportunity to give further insight into the Infinexhuma path, however there are often limitations, obstacles and at times failures that are not present in a studio setting. Embracing the failures and the death of expectations allows energy to be recycled and properly reutilized for exploration.

13. How often do you play live and do you have any plans to venture out on a larger scale for performing live?

Live services are conducted perhaps ten times or so a year, there have been some large scale events however there will be more, international service is within the scope as well.

14. We’re mid-way through 2022 and haven’t experienced new Infinexhuma material yet. Do you have something planned and what would be the direction of the material?

It has been some years now, and much work has been discarded, and much more will be created and burned, until the exact energy beam is captured. Artifacts are being prepared, yet completion is far and the time of unveiling is undetermined at this point.

15. As far as large scale collaborations, do you see any releases of this kind in the future? If so, who are some artists that you’d be interested in collaborating with?

There will be more co-operations along the journey and path, yet at this time I cannot elaborate on any who will contribute to the exploration. I will state that there are considerations, and some that may leap to genre crossing branches on the great tree of music

16. I really appreciate your time and letting us know about all things Infinexhuma. Any final thoughts for those that will read this interview?

Thank you for your effort and everything you do for the community of creatives, this will one day be read by artists hundreds of years beyond our existence as historical art exploration.

Links:

https://infinexhuma.bandcamp.com

https://www.instagram.com/infinexhuma/?hl=en

https://youtube.com/channel/UCWLRzVnGUKF78rEX0KiXysg